(Source: luciavictoria)

What type of social networking personality are you?

From Mashable: “According to a social behavior study by MyLife, which was conducted among 890 adults ages 18 and older, there’s a good chance you fit into one of these personas. In fact, if you’re a young parent, you are 88% likely to post pictures of your kids or talk about parenting at least once a month. Not to mention 25% of users are “vaguebooking” by posting intentionally vague updates which encourage people to react and inquire for more details.”

Use the infographic to find your social networking personality:

How to Use Storify as Your One-Stop Social Media Search Engine

futurejournalismproject:

Regardless of whether you actually want to create a storify. David Higgerson describes 12 tips with examples so read through his post.

Short version:

  1. Create a Storify, just for the sake of recording what you find.
  2. When searching, use the words people on social networks use.
  3. Make a beeline for Facebook, where you’ll find a lot of people to start with when looking for sources.
  4. Filter out retweets.
  5. Use Twitter images.
  6. Use the location filter carefully.
  7. Embed picture Tweets.
  8. Get your search criteria right on YouTube.
  9. Check photo dates on Flickr.
  10. Just because Instagram pictures are often filtered, doesn’t mean you can’t get valuable information from them.
  11. Storify lets you search Google too.
  12. Beware of hoaxes.

An addendum to #12: this post by Steve Buttry on how to verify information on Twitter.

Related: This piece on Andy Carvin, the “one man Twitter news bureau” and his social media news process.

futurejournalismproject:

Watch the World Tweet in Real Time
Tweet Ping is a kind of ticker for Twitter activity by continent, showing the last used hashtag, mention and word-, character- and tweet counts. As you can imagine, everything moves very fast. Feels like you’re in a high tech spy movie.

futurejournalismproject:

Watch the World Tweet in Real Time

Tweet Ping is a kind of ticker for Twitter activity by continent, showing the last used hashtag, mention and word-, character- and tweet counts. As you can imagine, everything moves very fast. Feels like you’re in a high tech spy movie.

Edit. 

Edit. 

(Source: lukesdiner)

emilyfreedom:

Mustache! Great time with @katborg. #library #fridaynight

emilyfreedom:

Mustache! Great time with @katborg. #library #fridaynight

: Jack Kerouac’s Rules for Spontaneous Prose

brandonweight:

1. Scribbled secret notebooks, and wild typewritten pages, for yr own joy

2. Submissive to everything, open, listening

3. Try never get drunk outside yr own house

4. Be in love with yr life

5. Something that you feel will find its own form

6. Be crazy dumbsaint of the mind

7. Blow as deep as…

(Source: litdrift.com)

nslayton:

betype:

Tweetin’ (by JoshwaaSayer)

It’s addicting.*
*Apologies to anyone who follows me on Twitter, I know I tweet way too much.

nslayton:

betype:

Tweetin’ (by JoshwaaSayer)

It’s addicting.*

*Apologies to anyone who follows me on Twitter, I know I tweet way too much.

pewresearch:

When voters were asked for a single word that described their reaction to Obama’s victory, Obama voters said they were “relieved” and “happy.” 
Romney voters generally said they were “disappointed” or “sad” about the election outcome. Romney voters also used the words “disgusted,” “sick,” “horrified” and “scared,” to describe their reaction to Obama’s victory.
Overall, 41% of those surveyed – including both voters and nonvoters – said they were happy that Obama was reelected president; 37% were unhappy and 22% neither. A majority of nonvoters (55%) said they were neither happy nor unhappy with the election outcome, while 29% said they were happy and 16% said they were unhappy.
Read more from the Pew Research Center for the People and the Press. 

pewresearch:

When voters were asked for a single word that described their reaction to Obama’s victory, Obama voters said they were “relieved” and “happy.” 

Romney voters generally said they were “disappointed” or “sad” about the election outcome. Romney voters also used the words “disgusted,” “sick,” “horrified” and “scared,” to describe their reaction to Obama’s victory.


Overall, 41% of those surveyed – including both voters and nonvoters – said they were happy that Obama was reelected president; 37% were unhappy and 22% neither. A majority of nonvoters (55%) said they were neither happy nor unhappy with the election outcome, while 29% said they were happy and 16% said they were unhappy.

Read more from the Pew Research Center for the People and the Press. 

This is the first legitimate use of Pinterest as a journalism tool I have seen. And I am on Pinterest a lot. Kuddos to Pottsdown Mercury for creating a new innovative outlet for one of newspapers’ traditional functions. Do you know of any other examples of Pinterest-as-journalism tool?

futurejournalismproject:

Wanted, On a Pinboard
Newspapers have long printed the local police blotter.
In the town where I grew up (population 5,000, one stop light) it was almost kind of fun in its ongoing innocence. Fictitious but accurate example: Suspicious car reported on Main Street, upon investigation police determined that Michael Smith was visiting his parents, Karen and Brian.
In our networked world, the blotter is taking new shapes. Or, those wanted by local police may find themselves on a Pinterest board and not just the local paper.
Via Slate:

The Pottstown Mercury, a local Pennsylvania newspaper, has come up with a simple, but effective way to use social networking to fight crime. A few months ago, Brandie Kessler, a reporter for the Mercury, set up a Pinterest board called Wanted by Police. It consists of a continuously updated roster of mug shots of wanted individuals in the Pottstown area along with a description of the crimes they are charged with. Within a few short months, tips generated through the board have led to a dramatic increase in the apprehension of suspects in this borough outside Philadelphia.
Kessler wrote in September that local police estimate a 58 percent increase in the number of arrests since the Pinterest site went up in July. (It’s worth noting that this is a borough of just 22,000 people, so a few arrests could make a huge difference. But still that is an impressive number.) Kessler says she had previously created a slideshow of people with warrants out for their arrest on the newspaper’s website, but because it didn’t operate smoothly and was difficult to share on Facebook and Twitter, it wasn’t nearly as popular. As of Monday night, Wanted by Police had 881 followers on a board featuring 59 mug shots.

Now, wanted doesn’t mean guilty which can lead to troubling privacy issues. So too turning a town and region into pinboard detectives. But the practice is an extension of what was traditionally written up in the local paper. Just way, way more publicly. 
Image: Screenshot, Wanted By Police, by the Pottsdown Mercury.

This is the first legitimate use of Pinterest as a journalism tool I have seen. And I am on Pinterest a lot. Kuddos to Pottsdown Mercury for creating a new innovative outlet for one of newspapers’ traditional functions. Do you know of any other examples of Pinterest-as-journalism tool?

futurejournalismproject:

Wanted, On a Pinboard

Newspapers have long printed the local police blotter.

In the town where I grew up (population 5,000, one stop light) it was almost kind of fun in its ongoing innocence. Fictitious but accurate example: Suspicious car reported on Main Street, upon investigation police determined that Michael Smith was visiting his parents, Karen and Brian.

In our networked world, the blotter is taking new shapes. Or, those wanted by local police may find themselves on a Pinterest board and not just the local paper.

Via Slate:

The Pottstown Mercury, a local Pennsylvania newspaper, has come up with a simple, but effective way to use social networking to fight crime. A few months ago, Brandie Kessler, a reporter for the Mercury, set up a Pinterest board called Wanted by Police. It consists of a continuously updated roster of mug shots of wanted individuals in the Pottstown area along with a description of the crimes they are charged with. Within a few short months, tips generated through the board have led to a dramatic increase in the apprehension of suspects in this borough outside Philadelphia.

Kessler wrote in September that local police estimate a 58 percent increase in the number of arrests since the Pinterest site went up in July. (It’s worth noting that this is a borough of just 22,000 people, so a few arrests could make a huge difference. But still that is an impressive number.) Kessler says she had previously created a slideshow of people with warrants out for their arrest on the newspaper’s website, but because it didn’t operate smoothly and was difficult to share on Facebook and Twitter, it wasn’t nearly as popular. As of Monday night, Wanted by Police had 881 followers on a board featuring 59 mug shots.

Now, wanted doesn’t mean guilty which can lead to troubling privacy issues. So too turning a town and region into pinboard detectives. But the practice is an extension of what was traditionally written up in the local paper. Just way, way more publicly. 

Image: Screenshot, Wanted By Police, by the Pottsdown Mercury.

An infographic visualizing the state of being Hispanic in America from CNN’s InAmerica blog. 

An infographic visualizing the state of being Hispanic in America from CNN’s InAmerica blog. 

nslayton:

soupsoup:

The Rumble 2012: Bill O’Reilly vs Jon Stewart (Full)

Behold, an actual debate.

A word to the wise: Our social media addiction

These days we get so caught up in the day to day journalism practices that we rarely sit back and think about why we do what we do.

Social media is now a big part of our day to day practices in journalism and its time to sit back and think about social media’s value to journalism and why we might be so “addicted” to it.

A post by the Huffington Post’s Craig Kanalley does just that. As journalists and students of journalism, we should regularly take the time to really think about why we do what we do and challenge ourselves and our norms in the pursuit of a more relevant and impactful journalism.